City of Calgary, January 2, 2020 – December sales improved to levels more consistent with activity recorded over the past five years. This follows weak sales activity last year.


A stronger second half in 2019 was enough to push annual sales up by one per cent.


“Price declines, lower mortgage rates and some modest improvements in full-time employment helped support some demand growth in the city. Reductions in supply are also contributing to the slow adjustment to more stable conditions in the housing market,” said CREB® chief economist Ann-Marie Lurie.


“As oversupply in the market continues to ease, we should start to see more stabilization in prices. However, conditions continue to favour the buyer and this is weighing on prices.”


December unadjusted benchmark prices were $418,500. This is just slightly lower than last month and one per cent below last year’s levels.


Overall prices in 2019 declined by three per cent over last year’s levels. The total adjustment in prices is a 10 per cent decline since the 2014 slowdown in the energy sector.


While there are signs of stabilization, conditions vary significantly by location, price range and product type.
Improvements in the resale market have been mostly driven by lower priced product or areas where price declines were enough to bring more purchasers back into the market.


For more information on the 2020 housing market, the annual forecast report will be released at CREB®’s 2020Forecast Conference & Tradeshow(www.crebforecast.com) on Jan. 14, 2020.


Detached


•  Improving sales in the second-half of the year helped offset earlier declines. This resulted in detached sales that are relatively unchanged from 2018 levels.
•  While city wide levels remained stable, homes priced under $500,000 recorded sales growth of nearly nine per cent. However, sales declined by 11 per cent for homes priced over $500,000.
•  When considering sales activity by district, sales activity eased or remained relatively stable across most districts. However, exceptions include the North West and South Districts which recorded annual sales growth.
•  Supply levels generally eased, but the adjustments were not consistent across the city as inventories rose in both the West and City Centre districts.
•  Detached benchmark prices were $480,100 in December contributing to the 2019 average of $484,808, three per cent below last year’s levels.
•  2019 price declines ranged from a one per cent in the North East district to a five per cent decline in the City Centre district.


Apartment


•  Stronger apartment style sales in December were enough to push annual levels to 2,672 units. This is just above last year’s levels.
•  The improvements were mostly driven by gains in the North, West and South East districts. This is offsetting the significant declines in the North East, North West and East districts.
•  New listings continue to ease across all districts except the South East. This district has seen a rise in new home constructionand is likely contributing to some of the rise in new listings and inventory. Despite these trends in the one district, easing inventories relative to the sales have helped reduce some of the oversupply in this segment.
•  Reductions in oversupply helped ease the rate of decline in resale apartment condominium prices. However, prices in December remained one per cent below last years levels with a price decline range of five per cent in the West district to a one per centincrease in the South East district.


Attached


•  The attached segment of the market has seen the largest improvements in sales when compared to the other product types. Annual sales improved by nearly seven per cent for a total of 3,780 sales.
•  Both row and semi-detached product recorded improving sales with easing new listings and inventories. However, there was some variation depending on the district.
•  December semi-detached prices were $388,200 and row prices were $283,000. Both segments saw annual price declines in excess of three per cent and remain well below previous highs.
•  Depending on the district, the range of price activity varied significantly across the semi-detached and row segments. In 2019, price activity ranged from a seven per cent decline in row prices in the East district to a one per cent increase for semi-detached product in the North district.


You can download the complete statistics package HERE.

Read full post

Courtesy of CREB


City of Calgary, December 2, 2019 – Year-to-date residential sales in the city remain just above last year’s levels due to improvements in the attached sector so far this year.


However, November sales activity eased over last year’s levels, mostly due to pullbacks in the apartment sector.
Meanwhile, new listings eased enough relative to sales to cause inventories to ease and the amount of oversupply to come down slightly compared to last year’s levels.


“Achieving more stable conditions will take time. Sales activity has been settling in at lower levels and is likely being influenced by the economic conditions and uncertainty weighing on our market,” said CREB® chief economist Ann-Marie Lurie.


“While the amount of supply in the market continues to ease, the persistent oversupply continues to weigh on prices.”
As of November, the citywide unadjusted benchmark price was $419,100. This is just below last month’s levels and two per cent lower than last year’s levels.


Market conditions continue to vary depending on price, location and product type. For example, prices have ranged from a year-to-date decline of nearly eight per cent for row product in the East district to a two per cent increase for semi-detached product in the North district.


Larger price declines are often caused by high supply in the new-home and resale markets relative to demand.


Detached


•  Detached sales improved in November over last year’s levels, mostly due to growth in the $400,000 –500,000 range. However, sales in November and overall activity remain low by historical standards.


•  Despite some recent gains in sales activity, year-to-date sales remain comparable to last year’s levels and 20 per cent below longer-term trends. However, detached sales have improved in both the North West and South districts this year.


•  Improving sales, combined with further declines in new listings, helped reduce inventories in this sector compared to levels recorded last year. However, supply levels remained elevated based on seasonal comparisons.


•  Like some of the other sectors, the detached market is slowly moving toward more balanced conditions. However, it is still oversupplied, and this trend continues to weigh on prices.


•  The detached unadjusted benchmark price was $481,500 in November, slightly lower than last month’s levels and two per cent below last year’s prices.


Apartment


•  Apartment sales pulled back this month, causing year-to-date sales to remain comparable to last year’s levels and 21 per cent below long-term averages.


•  The monthly decline in sales was mostly driven by pullbacks in the City Centre, North West and South East districts. However,ona year-to-date basis, sales activity improved in the North, West and South East districts.


•  New listings rose across most districts, causing city-wide inventory gains this month. Much of the gains were a result of a risein new-home listings filtering into the resale market. Despite the monthly shift, year-to-date new listings and inventories remain lower than last year’s levels.


•  Weaker sales, combined with rising inventories, pushed November months of supply to over seven months. This is higher than last year’s levels of more than five months.


•  Persistent oversupply in this sector caused prices to ease. The year-to-date benchmark price declined by more than two per cent.


Attached


•  Year-to-date sales remain more than six per cent higher than last year’s levels and just below long-term averages.


•  New listings eased this month compared to last year and sales improved. Inventories continue to ease from the monthly highs recorded last year. While the attached market remains oversupplied, the market continues to improve over last year’s levels.


•  November semi-detached prices eased by two per cent compared to last year. The largest year-over-year declines occurred in the City Centre district.


•  Row prices eased by nearly four per cent compared to last year. Annual declines ranged from more than seven per cent in the North East district to nearly two per cent in the North West and East districts.


You can download the complete statistics package HERE.

Read full post

Courtesy of CREB


Proximity to Calgary, affordable home prices and a variety of nearby amenities are making two towns in Mountain View County enticing options for house hunters willing to commute.


At about 40 minutes and 30 minutes from Calgary, respectively, Didsbury and Carstairs have helped some homebuyers balance a job in the city with the benefits of rural life.


“There are a lot of commuters (in Didsbury),” said Gord Leeson, an associate with Royal LePage Wildrose. “At 6 a.m., if you park by the main drag out of town, you’ll see car after car heading out, going to Calgary.”


“Under $300,000, you can find a very nice, three-bedroom, 1,200-square-foot home.” – Gord Leeson, Royal LePage Wildrose


Calgarians looking for more affordable homes are one of the key buyer demographics in these towns, he adds.

Year to date, both Didsbury and Carstairs have recorded an increase in year-over-year overall residential sales, according to CREB®.


Sales in Carstairs rallied 34 per cent from the same time in 2018, while transactions in Didsbury grew by 1.5 per cent. Both towns offer strong value, says Leeson.


“Under $300,000, you can find a very nice, three-bedroom, 1,200-square-foot home,” he said.


CREB® says the year-to-date benchmark price across all home types in Carstairs is $317,967, which is down 5.5 per cent year over year. In comparison, Calgary’s year-to-date benchmark price is $423,478.


“Now would be the time, if you wanted to buy,” said Leeson.


Carstairs and Didsbury, located about 10 minutes apart, have all the elements people look for in a community.

Leeson calls Didsbury the “best-kept secret,” adding “it has all the amenities.”


On this point, he singles out Didsbury District Health Services hospital, as well as the Didsbury Aquatic Centre, as important features in town.


“The schools are all here, all the shopping is here,” said Leeson. “You may not have the selection, but … from Carstairs, CrossIron Mills isn’t that far, (and) from Didsbury, Olds isn’t that far.


“You don’t have to worry about getting what you want and very seldom have to go into the city.”



If you have been thinking about getting out of the rat race of the city to a small community and have question, please give me a call.  (403) 253-7326

Read full post
Data supplied by CREB®’s MLS® System. CREB® is the owner of the copyright in its MLS® System. The Listing data is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed accurate by CREB®.
The trademarks MLS®, Multiple Listing Service® and the associated logos are owned by The Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) and identify the quality of services provided by real estate professionals who are members of CREA. Used under license.
The trademarks REALTOR®, REALTORS®, and the REALTOR® logo are controlled by The Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) and identify real estate professionals who are members of CREA. Used under license.